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ameliapond88:

Stat sua cuique dies
Stat sua cuique dies

To each his day is given
(Aeneid)


Mæl is me to feran

Time is it for me to go 
(Beowulf) 

Aleto men moi nostos
Aleto men moi nostos

Lost is my homecoming
(Iliade, Omero)


C’est pour cela que je suis née

I was born for this
(Joan of Arc)


Kono michi ya
Yuku hito nishi ni
Kono michi ya
Aki no kure

On this road 
Where nobody else travels
On this road 
Autumn Nightfall
(Matsuo Basho haiku)

C’est pour cela que je suis née
Ne me plaignez pas
C’est pour cela que je suis née 

I was born for this
Do not pity me
I was born for this
(Joan of Arc) 

Played 34493 times.

littlemoongoddess:

draelogor:

darkchocolateandtea:

fuckingconversations:

teamfreekickass:

spiffypop:

thebraveandmischievous:

housetohalf:

mysnarkasm:

When I grow up I want to be Ming-Na Wen.

She’s the voice of Mulan, as if she wasn’t amazing enough.

She broke it with her fingers. Not a fist, her fingers.

Girl is 50 years old.

FIFTY. YEARS. OLD.

fun fact: When you break things with your hands like that you have t break your fingers on purpose before so that they heal stronger. So basically this woman is so badass she broke her hands just to do this. 

You asshat, you’re making it sound like she snaps her fingers in half. 

Martial artists like Jackie Chan and Bruce Lee (and yes, fucking Ming-Na Wen, that beautiful badass) will build up their bone strength by repeatedly (and fairly gently) striking sand, gravel, wood and steel - this creates tons of microfractures in their bones (smaller than even a hairline fracture) so the bones will heal over again and make the bones stronger and denser with increased deposits of calcium. 

This has to be done over long-ass periods of time, so the bones have time to heal, and none of the fractures expand into actual breaks. 

Oh, and she’s doing precise-ass kicks in HIGH HEELS. 

she kicks ass like a coursing river

with all the force of a great typhoon

why be a man

WHEN YOU CAN BE MELINDA MAY

(Source: bucky-thevampireslayer)

graveyawn:

selva:

//cats & boxes

are you fuckin kiddin me
graveyawn:

selva:

//cats & boxes

are you fuckin kiddin me
graveyawn:

selva:

//cats & boxes

are you fuckin kiddin me
graveyawn:

selva:

//cats & boxes

are you fuckin kiddin me

graveyawn:

selva:

//cats & boxes

are you fuckin kiddin me

(Source: dope-pope)

cracked:

The Mummy returned. And you’re looking at why The Scorpion King didn’t.

21 Shockingly Lazy Special Effects in Big-Budget Movies

peashooter85:

Ornate bone and pearl inlaid flintlock musket crafted by Ignatius Nester, 18th century.
Sold at Auction: $5,000
peashooter85:

Ornate bone and pearl inlaid flintlock musket crafted by Ignatius Nester, 18th century.
Sold at Auction: $5,000
peashooter85:

Ornate bone and pearl inlaid flintlock musket crafted by Ignatius Nester, 18th century.
Sold at Auction: $5,000
peashooter85:

Ornate bone and pearl inlaid flintlock musket crafted by Ignatius Nester, 18th century.
Sold at Auction: $5,000
peashooter85:

Ornate bone and pearl inlaid flintlock musket crafted by Ignatius Nester, 18th century.
Sold at Auction: $5,000

peashooter85:

Ornate bone and pearl inlaid flintlock musket crafted by Ignatius Nester, 18th century.

Sold at Auction: $5,000

peashooter85:

The Brown Bess Cavalry Carbine,
Issued to British cavalry units during the Napoleonic Wars up to 1838, the Brown Bess Cavalry Carbine was the shortest, smallest, and lightest musket of the Brown Bess series.  In fact, it would probably fall into the category of “musketoon”.  Overall length was 42.5 inches, while weight was around 7.4 lbs.  By comparison its infantry counterpart, the “India Pattern” Brown Bess was a foot longer and over two pounds heavier.
Because of its compact size and light weight, the Brown Bess Cavalry Carbine was ideal for cavalry units.  They were especially popular among dragoons, a type of unit consisting of mounted infantry who rode to battle on horseback, but dismounted and fought as infantry once in combat.  
By the late 1830’s the flintlock igniting mechanism gave to way to the percussion system.  Many Brown Bess Cavalry carbines were converted into percussion locks.  Production ended in 1838, and was replaced with the more advanced M1842 pattern percussion musket.
peashooter85:

The Brown Bess Cavalry Carbine,
Issued to British cavalry units during the Napoleonic Wars up to 1838, the Brown Bess Cavalry Carbine was the shortest, smallest, and lightest musket of the Brown Bess series.  In fact, it would probably fall into the category of “musketoon”.  Overall length was 42.5 inches, while weight was around 7.4 lbs.  By comparison its infantry counterpart, the “India Pattern” Brown Bess was a foot longer and over two pounds heavier.
Because of its compact size and light weight, the Brown Bess Cavalry Carbine was ideal for cavalry units.  They were especially popular among dragoons, a type of unit consisting of mounted infantry who rode to battle on horseback, but dismounted and fought as infantry once in combat.  
By the late 1830’s the flintlock igniting mechanism gave to way to the percussion system.  Many Brown Bess Cavalry carbines were converted into percussion locks.  Production ended in 1838, and was replaced with the more advanced M1842 pattern percussion musket.

peashooter85:

The Brown Bess Cavalry Carbine,

Issued to British cavalry units during the Napoleonic Wars up to 1838, the Brown Bess Cavalry Carbine was the shortest, smallest, and lightest musket of the Brown Bess series.  In fact, it would probably fall into the category of “musketoon”.  Overall length was 42.5 inches, while weight was around 7.4 lbs.  By comparison its infantry counterpart, the “India Pattern” Brown Bess was a foot longer and over two pounds heavier.

Because of its compact size and light weight, the Brown Bess Cavalry Carbine was ideal for cavalry units.  They were especially popular among dragoons, a type of unit consisting of mounted infantry who rode to battle on horseback, but dismounted and fought as infantry once in combat.  

By the late 1830’s the flintlock igniting mechanism gave to way to the percussion system.  Many Brown Bess Cavalry carbines were converted into percussion locks.  Production ended in 1838, and was replaced with the more advanced M1842 pattern percussion musket.

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niebezpieczne:

vuoleballare:

Mr. Brightside - The Killers

Best song

Played 102815 times.

mascjock8guy:

AWESOME!!!

(Source: itdoesabitthough)

peashooter85:

If one were to watch any movie, TV series, or documentary about Ancient Rome, odds are the stereotypical Roman Legion would look something like this..

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While this is not a terribly inaccurate depiction of a Roman legion from around the time era of 0 - 280 AD, it is only what the Roman legions looked like in one small time era of Ancient Roman history.  Roman culture, excluding the Byzantine Empire, thrived in Europe from 753 BC to 476 AD.  In that time the Roman Legions evolved, using different weapons, equipment, and armor, then developing new equipment and tactics over time.

The First Legions (758 BC - 300 BC)

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The first Roman Legions were no different than the Greek and Etruscan armies who neighbored Rome.  Each soldier was called a hoplite (the Romans called them triarii), armed with a long spear or pike, and equipped with a leather, laminated linen, or bronze cuirass, a large shield, and a Greek style bronze helmet.  These hoplites would fight in a formation called a phalanx in which the hoplites would form a rectangular shield wall with their long spears pointed to the enemy.  

The army itself was composed of around 9,000 soldiers, divided into three legions of 3,000 each.  It was with this army that Rome managed to dominate and conquer Central Italy and expand its borders into Northern and Southern Italy.

The Manipular Legion (300 - 107 BC)

By 300 BC Phalanxes and Hoplites began to give way to more mobile and flexible units.  The Roman Army ditched its old Phalanx legions and adapted smaller units called Manipules.  Each manipule consisted of 120 men who were armed with a spear (later short sword), javelins, a square shield, and a bronze helmet.  The bronze helmet was open faced but featured cheek guards, giving the head good protection but allowing soldiers more hearing and vision on the battlefield.  This was important since infantry formations were more mobile and flexible, and needed to be able to hear orders from their commanders.  Since soldiers were required to purchase their own armor, three classes of soldiers were created based on the armor and equipment they could afford; the Hastati, the Principates, and the Triarii. They worked in a formation composed of three rows, with hastati in the front, principates in the middle, and triarii at the rear.

Hastati

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Hastati were lightly armored and lightly armed, usually only wearing a small brass plate over the chest for body armor.  The reason for this was because the hastati were recruited from the poorest Roman citizens.  Since soldiers had to purchase their own equipment, men of the hastati had to fight on the cheap.  Hastati were also usually the most inexperienced and youngest of the army.  Being poorly armed and ill-experienced, hastati were essentially cannon fodder.

Principates and Triarii

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Principates were recruited from the wealthier Roman citizens, and as such had better armor and equipment.  Unlike the hastati, a principate typically had a set of chain mail armor which protected his chest, abdomen, and arms.  Triarii made up the last row of the maniple.  Made up of the wealthiest Romans or the most veteran prinicpates, the triarii were the equipped with the best that money could buy and were the most heavily armed.  However most battles typically ended with the hastati and principates winning before the triarii could be pressed into battle.  Needless to say being among the triarii was the safest place to be in the Roman Army.

The maniple system would prove itself as Rome conquered Italy, defeated its rival Carthage in the Punic Wars and came to dominate the Mediterranean.  By then the army had grown from a meager force of 9,000 men to an army composed of tens of thousands of men.

The Marian Reforms 

In 113 BC a Germanic tribe called the Cimbri, along with their Germanic allies, invaded the Roman Republic.  The tough and warlike Cimbri overwhelmed the Roman Army, killing up to 80,000 soldiers at the Battle of Arusio in 105 BC.   The Romans found themselves in a situation in which they suffered manpower shortages, as the Cimbri had culled the elite citizens of Rome, yet the enemy was at the gates.  In desperation, the Romans elected the general Gaius Marius in absentia, an unprecedented move in the republic’s history.  Marius was immediately recalled from his post in Africa and given emergency powers to beat back the Cimbri.

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Marius eliminated the different classes of soldiers, and required that the state pay for equipment and weapons rather than having the soldiers pay for it.  This eliminated the wealth requirement to be recruited for the army, allowing for a larger pool of men to be called forward for military service.  Most importantly, all Roman soldiers were as heavily armed, armored, and well equipped as the triarrii once were. Each soldier wore a helmet and a chain mail shirt.  Each soldier was armed with a short sword, dagger, three throwing javelins, and a large square shield. Finally he reduced the manipules into smaller units of 80 men called centuries, which made the legions more flexible with tactics. This transformed the Roman Army into one of the most effective fighting forces in the world.  It was the army Caesar used to conquer Gaul, and the army used by Octavian (the first Emperor of Rome later called Augustus) to turn the Roman Republic into an empire.

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The Roman Imperial Army, The Classic Legion (30 BC - 280 AD)

File:Roman soldier in lorica segmentata 1.jpg

By now the Roman Republic has been transformed into the Roman Empire.  The legions too have been transformed into the aggressive, well armed, and well trained fighting force typically shown in the movies.  One of the biggest changes for the Roman soldier was the adoption of a new type of plate armor called the Lorica Segmentata, which was made from segmented strips of iron.  While offering unparalleled protection and maneuverability, according to re-enactors the lorica segmentata is ungodly uncomfortable to wear, causing chafing and blistering after extended periods of wear.  The Roman helmet also changed, with rims added around it to better protect from sword blows to the head.  A large visor was also added to the back to protect the back of the  neck.

The Late Roman Empire (280-350 AD)

File:Roman soldier 175 aC in northern province.jpg
By this time in Roman history the Roman Empire has reached the height of its expansion.  Rather than conquer more territories the legions evolved into a defensive force, tasked with patrolling the walls, outposts, and roads of the empire as well as repelling barbarian invasions.  As you can see the lorica segmentata is gone, replaced with chain mail armor.  The helmet has also become more enclosed, as the Roman soldier was now tasked with holding and defending ground rather than conducting aggressive assaults.  The square shield has been replaced with a lighter circular or oval shield, as Roman legions needed lighter armor and equipment with which to carry on patrols.  The less aggressive and more defensive nature of the legions also made the larger square shield less necessary.

The Decline of Rome 350 - 425 AD

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By now the empire is in serious decline, and the army is beginning to show it.  With less money for equipment, the quality of armor and weapons is beginning to decrease as well.  Notice the replacement of chain mail with a cheaper form of scale mail, made from small iron plates sewn together.  It offered protection that was as good as chain mail, but was much heavier and more uncomfortable. Later soldiers started wearing armor made from hardened leather which offered little protection compared to chain mail.  Weapons also declined in quality.  Instead of a wooden shield this soldier is armed with a large but flimsy leather shield.  He is armed with a simple stabbing spear rather than a Roman javelin.  Also Germanic and barbarian influences are taking its toll as more barbarians fill in the ranks of the army.  Many refused to use Roman equipment, rather opting to use their native weapons.

The Fall of Rome (425-476 AD)

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By the last decades of the empire the army had pretty done away with armor.  Rather infantry were armed with a simple spear, sword, and shield.  His helmet is of Germanic or barbarian origin, and most likely this soldier is not Roman, but a barbarian who has been recruited to fill in the ranks.  As the empire declined less and less Romans volunteered for military service, and more barbarians filled in the ranks.  By the fall of the Western Roman Empire in 476 AD, the Roman Army differed little from the barbarian armies that were carving up the remnants of the empire.